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Top The TRMA Discussion Forum topic #55777
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Subject: "RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck." Previous topic | Next topic
mauretania1906Wed Feb-07-18 06:13 PM
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#55818, "RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck."
In response to In response to 12
Thu Feb-08-18 06:39 PMby mauretania1906

  

          

Here is Mauretania at that time in November 1916 at Pier No. 2 in Halifax with her drab transport grays of the day being applied:



"...Considered too expensive to operate, and with her usefulness uncertain, Mauretania was laid up at Arran in Gare Loch, not very far from where she completed her trials just ten years earlier. During a particularly heavy gale on the voyage north, she broke her mooring cables in the Mersey and drifted helplessly for some time, until running safely aground on a sandbank. The Mauretania was refloated and was placed in Gladstone Dock until her anchors could be recovered; then she continued on to Greenock. There she lay for nearly the whole of 1917.
The Mauretania was requisitioned again in 1918, first wearing a rather drab olive, blue and black scheme in March as recorded by the USN, but soon after, certainly by July 1918 at NY, she was wearing a bold rich blue, black and grey geometric dazzle scheme designed by Norman Wilkinson in the summer of 1917 (Wilkison did paintings for Titanic's public rooms). Mauretania was temporarily renamed "H.M.S. Tuberose" (or "Tuber Rose", according to her Captain Sir A. H. Rostron of Titanic fame). The H.M.S. Tuberose made 7 trips from NY early in 1918, carrying 33,610 American troops to Europe as a transport with 4 six-pound bag loaded guns mounted to the existing re-enforced platforms on her bow and 2 additional guns on her stern, finally armed with six of the twelve guns she was originally designed to carry. After the Armistice in November 1918 she was largely disarmed, losing her bow guns first, and she carried another 19,536 returning American and Canadian troops home. She was slowly repainted into Cunard colors and finally released from Admiralty service on May 27th of 1919. On June 1st the Mauretania returned to regular service sailing from her new home port of Southampton..."



Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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Campania canvas on Promenade deck. [View all] , Jason, Wed Jan-31-18 04:04 AM
  RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., Ralph Currell, Feb 01st 2018, #1
RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., Jason, Feb 01st 2018, #2
RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., Ralph Currell, Feb 01st 2018, #3
RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., mauretania1906, Feb 02nd 2018, #4
      RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., Ralph Currell, Feb 03rd 2018, #5
           RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., mauretania1906, Feb 03rd 2018, #6
           RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., Ralph Currell, Feb 03rd 2018, #7
           RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., Jason, Feb 04th 2018, #8
                RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., mauretania1906, Feb 04th 2018, #10
           RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., Jason, Feb 04th 2018, #9
                RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., mauretania1906, Feb 04th 2018, #11
                     RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., Ralph Currell, Feb 05th 2018, #12
                          RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., mauretania1906, Feb 07th 2018 #13
                               RE: Campania canvas on Promenade deck., Ralph Currell, Feb 09th 2018, #14

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Titanic artwork at top of page is owned and copyright of Stuart Williamson and is used with permission.