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Subject: "3D Printing" Previous topic | Next topic
monkey95Tue Dec-11-12 04:34 PM
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#48274, "3D Printing"


  

          

Prompted by recent discussions about 3rd-party parts - eg photoetch conversions for Olympic/Brittanic, brass replacement propellers, requests for resin lifeboats - this has me wondering when 3D Printing will become commonplace for modelling.

3D Printing would open up so many options: making corrected or conversion parts for example. At 1/350 or smaller resin parts may be a thing of the past, and several of the parts currently made with PE Brass - eg the replacement A Deck Promenade outer bulkheads for Oly/Brit conversions - could be done with 3D Printing. A tiny piece flicks off the table and is lost forever in the carpet - nevermind print another one. Inevitably whole models could be printed (eg Nomadic).

Of course technologies like these start expensive, but will get cheap one day. At the moment a 3D Printer costs (UK)£1600, but this will drop. But even in these early days of the technology, we may already be at the point where it's economically viable to print off short production runs of pieces (though it's evidently still quite expensive for individuals to have one-off parts printed). Later, when the printers are cheap and many people have them, it may take the form of buying CAD-style files online to print parts, or these designs may appear in the public domain.

For those highly skilled in hand-making parts, they may resist this, and that's understandable (though the printed parts might still have sprue structures which need filing off, and then painting as usual). But by the time my son is old enough to do model-making, if he does, he may find that CAD plans play a significant (and fun) part in the process. This may be part of the way new generations get involved.

I am certainly not trying to sell anything here, I'm just wondering if people in the TRMA community are anticipating this? I imagine the first stage is 3D computer modellers combining with experts and historians to create accurate CAD files (which is no doubt already happening), and then it's up to production people and model companies to look into making it viable (though at some point in the near future things will change again and 3D printing will be even cheaper).

Any thought?

John H

  

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Replies to this topic
RE: 3D Printing, endare, Dec 11th 2012, #1
RE: 3D Printing, monkey95, Dec 12th 2012, #2
      RE: 3D Printing, Roy Mengot, Dec 12th 2012, #3
           RE: 3D Printing, William W. Young, Dec 12th 2012, #4
           RE: 3D Printing, ChrisCMR, Dec 12th 2012, #5
                RE: 3D Printing, endare, Dec 13th 2012, #6
                     RE: 3D Printing, monkey95, Dec 13th 2012, #7
                          RE: 3D Printing, bpread, Dec 13th 2012, #8
                               RE: 3D Printing, Scott Andrews, Dec 13th 2012, #9
                               RE: 3D Printing, endare, Dec 14th 2012, #12
                                    RE: 3D Printing, Jason, Dec 14th 2012, #13
                                    RE: 3D Printing, monkey95, Dec 14th 2012, #14
                                         RE: 3D Printing, Jason, Dec 14th 2012, #15
                                    RE: 3D Printing, Scott Andrews, Dec 18th 2012, #16
                                         RE: 3D Printing, endare, Dec 19th 2012, #17
                                              Very nice! (nm), Scott Andrews, Dec 20th 2012, #18
                                              RE: 3D Printing, monkey95, Dec 21st 2012, #19
                                              RE: 3D Printing, ChrisCMR, Dec 21st 2012, #20
                                              RE: 3D Printing, ChrisCMR, Dec 22nd 2012, #21
                                              RE: 3D Printing, endare, Dec 22nd 2012, #22
                                              RE: 3D Printing, ChrisCMR, Jan 29th 2013, #24
                               RE: 3D Printing, Roy Mengot, Dec 13th 2012, #10
                                    RE: 3D Printing, monkey95, Dec 13th 2012, #11
                                         RE: 3D Printing, mjs28c, Jan 02nd 2013, #23
                                              RE: 3D Printing, Jason, Jan 31st 2013, #25
                                                   3D Printing 1/100 Lifeboat, endare, May 20th 2015, #26
                                                        RE: 3D Printing 1/100 Lifeboat, titanicinfoseeker, May 20th 2015, #27
                                                             RE: 3D Printing, tmgarmon, Jun 02nd 2015, #28
                                                                  RE: 3D Printing, William W. Young, Jun 25th 2016, #30
                                                                       3D Printed Propellers, endare, Jun 28th 2016, #31
                                                                            RE: 3D Printed Propellers, William W. Young, Jun 28th 2016, #32
                                                                                 RE: 3D Printed Propellers, Josemar, Jun 29th 2016, #33
                                                                                      RE: 3D Printed Propellers, endare, Jun 29th 2016, #34
                                                                                           RE: 3D Printed Propellers, William W. Young, Jul 01st 2016, #35
                                                                                           RE: 3D Printed Propellers, Nightstriker, Mar 08th 2017, #36
                                                                                           RE: 3D Printed Propellers, endare, Mar 09th 2017, #37
                                                                                           RE: 3D Printed Propellers, Zenoms, Mar 09th 2017, #38
                                                                                           RE: 3D Printed Propellers, endare, Mar 10th 2017, #39
                                                                                           RE: 3D Printed Propellers, Zenoms, Mar 10th 2017, #41
                                                                                           RE: 3D Printed Propellers, Nightstriker, Mar 10th 2017, #40
RE: 3D Printing, Plutralias, Jun 23rd 2016, #29

endareTue Dec-11-12 10:57 PM
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#48276, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Hi John,

As mentioned in the other thread, i have done a bit of 3D printing - see this thread: http://titanic-model.com/dc/dcboard.php?az=show_topic&forum=100&topic_id=45228&mesg_id=45228&listing_type=search

The technology is here, and websites like Shapeways.com are making it all very easy. All you have to do is design the parts, and upload them.
The 3D printers that are available at the prices you have indicated are still very low resolution. We have one in the office, and it is great for making things like custom joystick grips and models of animals etc. It's not as good for detailed miniature work, especially at the scales commonly seen for ship models.
The gantry davits that i linked to in the other thread were too fine to last...the first batch broke in transit. The resolution of the printer is something like .1mm. I have since beefed up the dimensions of the 3D model, and the second print was quite good.

It is an intriguing idea to 'crowd-source' a model. With the interactivity of CAD software these days there is nothing stopping a group of people from all over the world designing parts for custom kits. The great thing is that there are no moulds required, the setup cost is quite minimal, and items can be purchased with ease in whatever quantity is required.

regards,
Nick

  

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monkey95Wed Dec-12-12 03:38 PM
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#48281, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Thanks Nick

OK - that's great. For benefit of all of us, do you mind if I pick your brains: Could you recap for us what you did to get those parts, and an idea of costs? And if you work with 3D modelling - what sort of technology is involved - eg software, file types etc? Is it something people can learn at home like Photoshop, or is strictly in the realm of trained CAD workers using professional workstations?

And in the short-medium term, is 3D printing at this 0.1mm resolution viable for individuals to send one-off parts to be printed as you did, or is it more likely that it would be better to be making short production runs and selling them through modelling outlets or online?

I'm just asking you to write some stuff here because clearly this is going to be a significant new aspect to scale-modelling, and we need to start engaging in it.

Thanks again,
John H

  

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Roy MengotWed Dec-12-12 05:10 PM
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#48282, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 2


          

I think this technology is definitely coming. I still remember when this photo-etched brass stuff was a curiosity and while the potential was there, who's gonna do it?

I think the first benefactors of this will be the model railroaders and the plane and armor modelers. When I built my model of the Titanic wreck in '96, I went to a model railroad shop to look for interesting shapes that might be useful. Ship PE wasn't around much or in the wrong scales so I bought some railing for a railroad tank car (which became my crane railings) and cast lead fixtures for a locomotive that I thought might work for engine room wreckage. The clerk said, "Ah, building an F3 diesel?" I said, "No. The Titanic." I got the funny look you'd expect.

Laying out the parts will happen one of two ways, drawings or scans. Learning a drawing package is like any other difficult computer tool like a high-end graphics package. I wanted more custom PE for my wreck so I learned the industrial drawing package AutoCad for the basic art. People in three states were involved before I had brass parts to glue on my model. That's a tough way to do it if you can.

3-D scanners are the other way. Start with a physical piece you got from where ever. The scanner creates the print file. Such a scanner of course is part of the startup cost for a 3P (3-D print) business. The beauty of it is the computer can then scale the file. "You need a late version cast gun mantle for your Jag Panzer IV? We have the 3P file so what scale would you like it in? 1/18? Not a problem."
Scan a 1/48 kit and produce a 1/12 3P kit. Who knows? It may help development of the software and toner resins they use.

Keep asking about this in modeling stores, in letters to companies, and on forums. 3P will come around the same way PE did. Plastic models may have 3P variant parts added or available in kits the way the PE parts are now. Now's the time to get into the ground floor of 3P after-market parts.

My two cents...

Regards
Roy Mengot
TRMA Trustee

  

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William W. YoungWed Dec-12-12 08:12 PM
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#48286, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 3


          

I have read everything you guys have written on this 3D modeling subject. My take on it is this. First it sounds facinating and I am all for anything new that streamlines the process of producing accurate and lasting parts. The only thing I would say as a computer failure is that there are probably enough computer impared folks out there World wide that would gladly pay to purchase these parts in different scales. Because I can speak for myself. If I have to be proficient enough myself to produce these programs it ain't gonna get done.
Sincerely , Bill Young

William W. Young

  

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ChrisCMRWed Dec-12-12 08:20 PM
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#48287, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 3


          

I agree Roy, it is likely to be the model railroad, plane and car areas which create the impetus for this.

An interesting development here in the UK concerns the model railway company Bachmann, which is now using 3D scanning technology to laser-scan preserved full-size steam locomotives to create digital 3D models, from which moulds are designed to produce new models of each loco type. They have now done this at least 3-4 times, sometimes on behalf of other companies/retailers. No 3D-printing has been tried by them (as far as I know), but that may be their next development.......

Would existing 3D printers be capable, hypothetically, of producing 1:350 Olympic/Britannic conversion sets from Peter Davies-Garner's existing drawings, or is their quality not yet sharp enough? From Nick's earlier post, I suspect existing printers are not there yet.

But it surely won't be long, once existing printer manufacturers realise the potential business 3D printing will create (if they haven't already).......

Chris

  

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endareThu Dec-13-12 01:39 AM
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#48292, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 5


          

Hi,

From what I can see, the technology has already had a massive uptake in the areas of Jewelry, miniature figurine makers, robot makers and iphone case designers, and yes, the train folks are well into it by now.

I absolutely think that it is feasible to 3D print a conversion kit in 1/350 for Olympic/Britannic. I think cost is prohibitive though. Considering that if you were to buy my Gantry Davits from shapeways.com, a complete set for RMS Britannic would cost you $70 plus postage; in the days when Tom Nicolai’s set was available you could get the whole conversion set for $80.
In my opinion the big-ticket changes on a 1/350 Titanic to Olympic/Britannic are large flat areas, like decks and superstructure. I don’t think these are ideal candidates for 3d printing, they are better off being cut by hand/photo-etched/laser-cut (I had some laser cut). That leaves deckhouses, lifeboat arrangements and ventilators. The deckhouses are pretty straightforward, so it really comes down to the fiddly bits. I think the Gantry Davits and maybe the motor-boats are probably all i will do on my Britannic in 3D printing - and i am more than happy to make the 3D files available to anyone else once i am happy with the finished piece.

As for learning how to do it:
Software – I use AutoCAD. I use it because I know it having spent years working on it in my job. For those that know CAD software, it is kind of a dinosaur program, not ideal for this type of work, and the first-time user would be much better served starting fresh on something else.
Blender, Google Sketchup and Inventor Fusion are three FREE programs that come to mind for 3D modeling. The bottom line is you need to export your 3D model to .STL or .OBJ
(look here: http://www.shapeways.com/support/design_upload_and_3dprint)

Creating the model – It’s the same as drafting or building your physical model, only it is virtual. You get your hands on as many bits of research and plans that you can, and you start drawing in the computer. That probably sounds too simplistic, but short of a full tutorial I’m not sure what else to write. Would a tutorial useful? If I do a step-by-step of the making of one part, might that be of some assistance?

Regards,
Nick

  

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monkey95Thu Dec-13-12 08:51 AM
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#48296, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 6


  

          

Hi Nick

I'm sure I wouldn't be alone in thinking it'd be really interesting to see a tutorial on modelling a part.

I can see your point that 3D would suit some parts not others (at this stage). For instance (at 1/350) small parts like top-deck pieces eg vents, lifeboat davits etc might be good but not flat decks. What about A Deck Promenade sides for Oly/Brit converions?

I will look at some of the software you mentioned - see if it's viable to learn how to use it.

One point Nick mentioned, 'crowd-sourcing', leads to another question: if accurate parts and Olympic/Brittanic conversions are in the interests of the TRMA community and beyond, then perhaps there could be a cooperative effort here. It could be about putting the community ahead of the small profit potential. One way to do this would be for TRMA members to combine to create accurate 3D models of parts, and the resulting files would be owned by TRMA. Or if the project was worldwide, the resulting files could be published as Copyleft.

Over time, these parts may be subject to revision as better information comes in, as experts and historians make criticisms and corrections.

If TRMA had the license to the 3D files, they could either sell them online or take a cut from licensing the designs to a company like Toms. If the 3D files were Copyleft, Toms or anyone else could still make and sell them, and they would otherwise be free to download.

The advantage of the cooperative model is that it's often a great way to create something for the common good, and the output is the result of the best minds at work (who may be scattered across the globe). The disadvantage is that sometimes people may have to 'donate' something of theirs to help the project - or work for free - and there is the question of who owns the resulting output. 'Copyleft'-type publishing licenses (eg Creative & Scientific Commons, GPL etc) are designed to tackle this - they are legally standing copyright licenses which mean that the resulting work is guaranteed to stay in the 'commons', and nobody can commandeer or take ownership of it (so people can contribute in good faith knowing that it will not be ripped-off by someone later). Wikipedia is a successful use of Copyleft. Having said that if 3D files were made within TRMA, then it could be agreed that TRMA own them.

Being neither a 'Grade A' Titanic expert nor a 3D modeller, I am not in a position to begin such a project, but I hope this moves the discussion forward.

Thanks
John H

  

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bpreadThu Dec-13-12 09:02 AM
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#48297, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 7


          

John:
Without a profit potential it is highly doubtful that anything even approaching what you describe would ever happen. The amount of time and expense involved (have you priced AutoCad lately?) requires more incentive than the collective good of the Titanic modeling community. Harsh truth but true nevertheless.
If one did work for free he would come face to face with what I consider to be an immutable law of the universe: No good deed goes unpunished.

Regards,
Bob Read

TRMA trustee

  

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Scott AndrewsThu Dec-13-12 09:57 AM
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#48298, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 8


  

          

Let me preface my remarks with this: I've been a draftsman and a mechanical designer since the late 70's, and I've been a CAD user since the "Dark Ages" of circa 1980, so I have some knowledge on the topic of both CAD and stereolithography -- 3D printing.

The price of equipment and software just to generate good 3D models is the biggest drawback for anyone without very deep pockets who wants to get seriously involved in making this step. Insofar as CAD software goes, in order to make decent 3D models that can be easily manipulated and will traslate into .STL files and the like without errors -- especially those which contain complex surfaces -- one would definitely have to make the jump beyond AutoCAD and freeware. AutoCAD is fine for developing PE sheets and other "flat" work, but it's 3D capabilities are, to be charitable, crude at best. A software package such as SolidWorks or SolidEdge and machine that is capable of running high-end CAD/CAM programs is what is required at a minimum to be able to do everything that a modeler is likely to eventually want to do.

Regards,
Scott Andrews
TRMA Trustee

  

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endareFri Dec-14-12 05:01 AM
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#48310, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 9


          

Hi Scott:
I wish to respectfully offer a different opinion. AutoCAD is certainly cost-prohibitive for hobby work, however the more recent ACAD program releases have taken much from Inventor/SolidWorks and the 3D capabilities are much more advanced. Yes, it is crude compared to the 3D-specific programs, but I have had little trouble creating accurate, workable 3D models for STL output.

That said - it is certainly not for everyone. I feel I am too entrenched in AutoCAD now to switch to something else, but the proliferation of freeware programs like Sketchup and Blender mean that anyone can start to learn 3D modeling, and these programs are now totally capable of matching the detail required for scale model work AND outputting to Stereo-lithographic file types. There is even a free Autodesk iPad app (123D design) that allows you to build a 3D object and send it (through a convoluted payment system) to be printed. Admittedly you need to be quite Apple-dexterous…

But this software is a tool: the output is only as good as the input. To create a good 3D part you still have to do the same research you would do for a scratchbuilt part, as well as being computer literate. And until one of these machines can print a 9ft 1/100 hull – I’ll still be scratchbuilding 95% of my model.

Regards,
Nick

  

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JasonFri Dec-14-12 06:13 AM
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#48311, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 12
Fri Dec-14-12 06:54 AMby Jason

  

          

Fully agree.

I work mostly with 3D Studio Max, which is actually a polygon editor for visualisation purposes and nothing to do with CAD, and I have had things "printed" from this using a local bureau. Shapeways also will do it, much more cheaply. If you do your modelling right it is possible. I've heard people having stuff printed out from Blender and even Google SketchUp, which is free. The key is to model in appropriate way.

It is not necessary to use Solidworks, AutoCAD or NURBS based editors like Rhino3D, to model parts accurate enough to be "printed" out and used in physical models. Those programs are designed to a level of accuracy required in engineering, not model building.

I think there is a great future in 3D printing, as it gets more and more popularised.

The downside is that it's yet another example of computers taking over from human skill, and I can understand there being resistance to that. I mean, right now, if I wanted to build a waterline 1/1200 model of ANY SHIP, I could do it in a day on the PC, then send it the files to Shapeways to get a few parts printed out. I'd then paint and assemble the parts and the result would be better than any commercial kit you can get.

/Jason

  

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monkey95Fri Dec-14-12 08:19 AM
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#48312, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 13


  

          

Hi All
Last night I downloaded Blender and did some tutorials about it, with a view to creating one piece - probably a part missing or wrong from the Minicraft kit - for printing at 1/350. Judging by how it looks I think I could go ahead and do it with Blender, but I was wondering if any of you guys (well specifically Nick and Jason) think that this program is worth learning? or is it a bit like Gimp is to Photoshop - does effectively the same job but the interface is more difficult.

Or would it be worth getting a trial version of say 3DS Max Design, or Inventor, if those might have a better, and more 'industry standard' interface?

And also, another factor is: whether I make the 3D model in Blender or another, can I output it to a file type which other 3D progs can transparently open and edit? This could be decisive because if I do make a part, I would probably release it as Copyleft, and invite others to tweak it.

Thanks
John H

  

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JasonFri Dec-14-12 08:54 AM
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#48313, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 14
Fri Dec-14-12 01:06 PMby Jason

  

          

As I mentioned, I use 3D Studio Max for my modelling, but I have heard only good things about Blender's modelling capabilities.

Blender was originally devised as an all-in-one solution for making amateur computer games. I believe the game creation features remain, but are not up to industry standard. Don't bother learning that bit. I'd focus learning Blender's modelling aspects only.

Normally when you use 3D modelling software, you're producing models for computer simualations and games. Models for this purpose require "textures", "normal maps" and eventually "lightmaps", and special "UV coordinates" to make those maps work. But for 3D printing you can skip learning all of that because all that is required for "3D printing" is a white, physical model. You only need to learn how to model - which is the least complex part.

I can't speak for Inventor, but I've heard Industrial Designers like it.

3D Studio Max is really only worthwhile if you're producing professional digital models for games, or if you want to do some photorealistic rendering (like Parks Stephenson's work, for example), or for making high quality short animated films. I think it's overkill for what you want.

Blender is definitely a good modelling program and is widely used in the production pipeline by developers to produce add-on models for various games, such as RSC's "Rail Simulator" (Currently Train Simulator 2013). Blender supports several export formats also.

Hope this helps
/Jason

  

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Scott AndrewsTue Dec-18-12 11:29 AM
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#48327, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 12


  

          

Hi Nick,

I agree that you can get very good results from the latest releases of software that have borrowed heavily from the platforms of CAD packages such as SW and Inventor. They will most certainly do much of what the average user will expect of them, particularly when most of the output required is comprised of more basic geometric shapes -- cylinders, cones, blocks, etc. which, when grafted together, form the object to be modeled. For instance, the arm of a Welin davit is nothing more than a construct of several dozen basic geometric shapes. Such software could remove a lot of the drudgery involved in making parts were a lot of "repeats" are required. (Unfortunately, at least for me, it also removes a lot of the artisanship of crafting scratchbuilt models or parts, which is what attrached me to model-making in the first place!)

The place where trouble can be encountered is in producing accurate and error-free solid models of something such as a propeller. While free-form shapes such as a propeller blade can be adequately modeled in many software platforms and will work fine for creating representations on line drawing or for creating a surface mesh for use in CGI work, the results obtained will often produce failures in the form of tiny gaps and mismatched surface edges that will fail to produce a "solid" during conversion to a STEP file or and STL. And, to be fair, even very high-end CAD software is prone to these difficulties.

Regards,
Scott Andrews
TRMA Trustee

  

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endareWed Dec-19-12 04:30 PM
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#48332, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 16


          

Hi all,

Just following up this thread with a pic of the 1:350 gantry davits i have modelled and had made by shapeways.
On the left is an unpainted Davit, as it arrives in the post. On the right is a Davit with one coat of flat white spray. In between is an aussie $1 coin for scale (no - i'm not counterfeiting!) The $1 is about the same size as a US quarter.
There is a hole in the davit for threading monofilament rigging.

regards,

Nick


Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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Scott AndrewsThu Dec-20-12 03:02 PM
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#48334, "Very nice! (nm)"
In response to Reply # 17


  

          


Regards,
Scott Andrews
TRMA Trustee

  

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monkey95Fri Dec-21-12 04:18 AM
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#48337, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 17


  

          

Really good to see, Nick

Out of interest... I notice the davits have several surface textures - was that deliberately put into the 3D model, or was it the product of shaping the parts with an abrasive?

And with the actual resulting plastic - how would you describe its characteristics - is it brittle and inflexible or strong and bendable? Is it a bit waxy and resistant to sanding, or is it chalky and crumbly?

I'm just trying to get an idea of what the material is like. These factors may need to be taken into account when modelling it (at 1/350) - for instance there might have to be compromises at times between scale accuracy and giving the part enough thickness/strength within itself.

Thanks
John H

  

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ChrisCMRFri Dec-21-12 01:12 PM
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#48339, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 19


          

Good points John,

Especially relevant as to how they will take glue and paint.

I'd have thought the next Britannic items worth making this way would be the lifeboats, as they are the other parts which would be very hard to scratchbuild, I may end-up converting Minicraft Titanic ones for my model.

Many thanks for the photo Nick, and Merry Christmas!

Chris

  

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ChrisCMRSat Dec-22-12 09:49 AM
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#48346, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 20


          

Just seen an interesting news item in Heritage Railway magazine (UK publication).

A Dr Chris Thorpe is currently investigating how 3D printing can be used to produce plastic model kits (of narrow-gauge railway locomotives and rolling stock) in different scales. Fascinatingly, the method even allows for the exact miniature reproduction of the individual wear-and-tear seen on different locomotives, due to the 3D scans made of the real engines.

This will be worth following in the UK railway press to see how the technology delivers in terms of kit quality and price, potentially opening the door for ship modellers.........

Chris

  

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endareSat Dec-22-12 02:46 PM
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#48351, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 19


          



Hi,

The slightly furry surface texture is a result of the printing process. As I have not really been focused on this project for a couple of months, I haven’t taken the time to sand the parts in any way.
There are some plating textures there; obviously these were intentional.
The plastic is comparable to styrene at this scale, ie if the part had been injection molded it would have similar strength/bend properties. The plastic from shapeways is a little harder though, and does have a slight Teflon quality in that it can be tough to sand.
As for glue and paint, I find that enamel paints or sprays are fine, in this case I have used Design Master Flat White spray. I use Zap-a-Gap for gluing without any trouble. It is advisable to first wash the parts in warm water though, as the printing process leaves some traces of wax, which will not take paint at all.

As I have mentioned elsewhere, the first print of these davits failed. After that I beefed up some dimensions, for instance a piece of 4.5” angle bar might become 6” square section (when modeling the full-sized piece) The area that failed was the trussing framework that connects the base of the davit with the head.

Regards,
Nick

  

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ChrisCMRTue Jan-29-13 11:09 AM
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#48561, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 17


          

A quick question,

An article on 3D Printing has just been in the latest edition of 'Model Rail' magazine here in the UK. In it a piece of free 3D design software called "Autodesk 123D" is recommended.

Having looked at that software's website, I've just noticed that it includes a component called "123D Catch", which allows the user to create 3D models from photos of objects. 20-40 photos of an object can then be used to create realistic 3D models of virtually anything - persons, places, things etc.

I'm thinking, could I use this to create 3D models of 1:350 scale Britannic lifeboats (the bigger ones for the gantry davits)? In which case does anyone have any of the cast Resin lifeboats made by Tom Nicolai which they could perhaps send me photos of? Or, failing that, the dimensions of one of those boats so I can scratchbuild one from plastic, which I can then photograph for the same purpose?

Any help would be gratefully appreciated!

Chris

  

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Roy MengotThu Dec-13-12 10:05 AM
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#48299, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 8


          

I agree with Bob here. Don't be too fast in volunteering TRMA for anything. We're just a collection of interested modelers and researchers. Getting any kind of actual business going takes commitment, lots of time, and money. Copyrights are only as good as the lawyers you hire to enforce them. Buying expensive software and learning to use it takes commitment. Even handling the material commits our meager resources. If someone wants to do these things, we'll facilitate advertising the product, after reviewing the quality, but that's about it.

In the meantime, if what you're trying to build isn't out there yet, use the tried and tested method - scratchbuilding.

Regards
Roy Mengot
TRMA Trustee

  

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monkey95Thu Dec-13-12 04:14 PM
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#48304, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 10


  

          

Thanks for everyone's replies, though the tone was a bit pessimistic.

The other thread is much more positive and answering a lot of the questions I had about 3D printing.
http://titanic-model.com/dc/dcboard.php?az=show_topic&forum=100&topic_id=45228&mesg_id=45228&page=

The fact is that 3D printing is coming into modelling, and I was simply prompting discussion about it.

Roy: I wasn't 'volunteering' TRMA for anything, I was speculating about how people could cooperate on this. I'm not disagreeing with you, maybe this is beyond what TRMA would tackle, it was just a suggestion.

It's great that there's at least a couple of people on this forum who are already working with 3D modelling/printing, who can help the rest of us make sense of it, and I'm sure a picture will emerge about how we can incorporate this new technology in due course.

Thanks
John H

  

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mjs28cWed Jan-02-13 05:58 PM
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#48393, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 11


          

Can anyone tell me what software program would be best for 3-D printing?

Would any good CAD program be a good choice?

I'm very experienced with 3dsMax, and taught it online for 8 months a while back.

Thanks!

  

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JasonThu Jan-31-13 07:45 AM
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#48580, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 23


  

          

I used to teach 3D Studio Max, and although it's not CAD software, it can be used for 3D printing, so I'd stick with that.

  

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endareWed May-20-15 06:24 PM
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#52850, "3D Printing 1/100 Lifeboat"
In response to Reply # 25


          

Hi folks,

This old thread seemed to be the appropriate place for this; I was rifling through Thingiverse.com when I happened upon a free download:

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:757463

I've downloaded it and printed it at home on my Makerbot, it seems to be a good model with a nice detail as seen in the pics, and it is correct to scale.

I don't know who the creator is, perhaps they frequent this site? But well done, very nice.
According to Thingiverse, this model is free of copyright; you could legally download the model and resize it to different scales as required.

regards,

Nick

  

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titanicinfoseekerWed May-20-15 07:05 PM
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#52851, "RE: 3D Printing 1/100 Lifeboat"
In response to Reply # 26
Wed May-20-15 07:07 PMby titanicinfoseeker

  

          

Nice find Nick!

What are they made of? Looks like styrene.
Never heard of a makerbot actually, sounds pretty cool from the google results I searched!

Thanks for sharing!
Gus

  

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tmgarmonTue Jun-02-15 10:36 AM
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#52885, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 27
Tue Jun-02-15 10:40 AMby tmgarmon

          

Hi everybody!

Just to bring you up to date on what I've been doing regarding 3D printing parts. I'm planning my HMHS Britannic model build. I had ordered and received the Britannic Davits from Shapeways, which Nick did a great job designing. Since there are no longer any conversion kits available, I thought I'd try my hand at designing parts and having them printed. I started with the B-C deck sides (Thank you Nick for supplying drawings). Now, Shapeways offers many different materials to make things out of, and I wanted to try to make the deck sides in one piece, which limited my material choices. The least expensive material they use, they call "Strong and Flexible Plastic", which is more of a nylon type of material. It was my only choice for a part this length, so I figured 'Why not?' Here are the results. They turned out pretty good, a little rough around the edges and will need some cleaning up, but not too bad at all!

I currently have more parts on order from them. I will post up results when I get them.

Tom

(Apologize for the lousy pictures. My phone is old.....)

Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)
Attachment #3, (jpg file)
Attachment #4, (jpg file)

  

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William W. YoungSat Jun-25-16 08:41 AM
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#54090, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 28


          

Your phone may not be up to date , however your technology skills are. Nice work !

William W. Young

  

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endareTue Jun-28-16 05:21 AM
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#54092, "3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 30


          

hi,

Very nice work on that 3D 1:72 Titanic, what a project!

Meanwhile I have managed to model and 3D print a set of Titanic Propellers, shown here in scales 1:100, 1:144 and 1:350. Hopefully I'll get them up to shapeways.com soon. As you can see I've tested the waters with a model of a 3-bladed centre prop... it's design based on a photoshop that Sam Halpern did on this site a few years ago.

regards,

Nick






Attachment #1, (gif file)
Attachment #2, (gif file)

  

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William W. YoungTue Jun-28-16 08:54 PM
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#54095, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 31


          

I am interested in a set of 1:144 th. Scale props mercguy1@aol.com

William W. Young

  

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JosemarWed Jun-29-16 02:40 PM
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#54100, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 32


  

          

What is the price of the set of propellers for titanic scale 1/144?

Josemar

  

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endareWed Jun-29-16 04:09 PM
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#54101, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 33


          

Hi,

As soon as I'm happy with what shapeways.com can do I'll post a link here.
I won't know anything about price until then, the process will probably take a month. Shapeways sets the price, which is dependent on which material you get it printed in. The small 1:350 props will likely only print in one material, but as the props get larger in scale the material options increase; It should be possible to print a 1:100 or 1:87 prop in metal. I suspect that will be pricey however.

regards,

Nick

  

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William W. YoungFri Jul-01-16 06:14 AM
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#54106, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 34


          

Thank You Nick , looking forward to hearing from you with regard to this. mercguy1@aol.com

William W. Young

  

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NightstrikerWed Mar-08-17 03:57 AM
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#54748, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 34


          

Hey Nick,

do you have any news on your 3D printed propellers project? A friend of mine and me both have a 1/150 scale Titanic and your propellers look alot better than the ones on our models. It would be fantastic if we could order them with Shapeways in 1/150 (port, starboard and both 3-bladed and 4-bladed center screw Version).

Best regards,
Alex

  

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endareThu Mar-09-17 03:29 AM
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#54753, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 36


          

hi Alex,

Many people have contacted me regarding these props. I've had a modelling error with the 3-bladed centre propeller that made me put the project to one side for a moment, and then I was inundated with work. I think I've finally resolved the problem, hopefully the props will all go up on Shapeways soon.

As with any hobby, I come back to it when I can. My day job involves a lot of 3D modelling. When I come home late at night it's a real drag to get back on the machine and grind out the hours modelling away. And with any hobby, you need to take time away from it so you can come back refreshed and inspired.

I want to get to all of the requests. I will. It just takes time.

Nick

  

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ZenomsThu Mar-09-17 11:24 AM
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#54755, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 37


          

Nick,

I have at home an amateur 3D Printer the XYZ DaVinci 1.0 Pro and I created a couple of parts to replace some Minicraft Parts that I believe should be improved. I saw your work on Shapeways, but I was wondering if you also sell the 3D file itself so I could print at home? And also if you are planning to create more parts for 1/350 (or that can be resized for 1/350)

P.S I have very limited 3D creating abilities, only very basic stuff...

Thanks

Zeno Silva
Hollywood, FL

  

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endareFri Mar-10-17 01:28 AM
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#54760, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 38


          

Hi Zeno,

I get a few requests to purchase the 3D files. A couple of things always end up stopping me.

1) It is my hobby work, undertaken in my own time - I really don't know how to value it.

2) Once i sell it to one person, the model is out there, i have no control over where it goes, so it'll just end up in the ether.

The 3D work builds on the shoulders of giants - I have bought Bob Reads plans,Hahn plans, TTSM, PDG book etc, i'm always using THEIR work as reference. I don't have access to those researchers hard-earned original documents (save for what is out there as builders drawings etc), so to me the models I make are still interpreting other sources, and I won't aggressively stand by my work as being totally accurate...(it's accurate, scale permitting)

I am slowly (over a period of years) doing a 1:350 RMS Britannic. That's why I made the davits.
I had intended to do a whole heap of Britannic pieces, but it would involve measuring the Minicraft kit accurately, which doesn't correspond to the accurate drawings out there. Probably I will do smaller items in the future - people seem to be keen on the motorboat so that should be next. Some of my 3D model work doesn't lend itself to scales smaller than 1:150.

I did do a set of Laser-cut Perspex decks and Superstructure sides that I can sell for about $70 AUD for the Britannic. I have sold them to someone on here, I haven't had any complaints, so i assume the pieces work.

I hope this helps clarify.

regards,

Nick

  

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ZenomsFri Mar-10-17 06:04 AM
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#54763, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 39


          

Nick,

Thank you for the prompt response. I completely understand your point. Also it is very true.

I look forward in seeing your work, I think 3D printing is a very interesting option to those modelers like myself that sre not the most skilled with styrene and would like to achieve better results.

Kindest regards,

Zeno Silva
Hollywood, FL

  

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NightstrikerFri Mar-10-17 04:39 AM
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#54762, "RE: 3D Printed Propellers"
In response to Reply # 37


          

Hey Nick,

thanks alot for the quick answer. I can imagine how much time went into this and I can't wait to have them on Shapeways. But you're right, from time to time you need to step down from any hobby in order to stay focused.

When you put them on Shapeways, please add them our scale (1/150) and in both versions (3 bladed an 4 bladed for the center prop).

Thanks again!

Best regards, Alex

  

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PlutraliasThu Jun-23-16 06:42 AM
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#54089, "RE: 3D Printing"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Please see the link to an article on my 100% 3d printed 1/72nd build.
Still a work in progress, and the prototype will be "messy" to prove it works. I will upload my STL files for download to anyone who wants to add to it an improve in the future.

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20160623-titanic-reborn-as-amazing-4m-long-2000-part-3d-printed-1-72nd-scale-model.html

  

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Titanic artwork at top of page is owned and copyright of Stuart Williamson and is used with permission.