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Subject: "Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100" Previous topic | Next topic
Michael 400Wed May-21-14 06:35 AM
Member since May 19th 2014
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#7154, "Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
Fri May-23-14 05:06 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello all,

as a private modeler I am building since several years on my Titanic model with some smaller models all in scale 1:100 for size comparison. I also started to complete a second set of parts (winches, bollards, lifeboats, etc., etc.) for my Olympic in the same scale. It will show the ship somewhat after March 1913 after her Refit with the complete set of 68 boats, but before her larger side anchors were installed on 31st January 1914. I work to some H&W plans and a lot of books and plans from the experts of this site, with new details come to light every week since many years. So the Olympic and Titanic models will be about 28,2 cm wide at the bilge and 28,8 cm at the boat deck incl. plating, etc. Fortunately I started with Titanic from the beginning with these dimensions and the correct lines plan. But with the lot of information updated regarding Titanic in the last years, I worked parallel on the smaller models too and waited a while with Titanic.

The materials are plywood, glass reinforced epoxy resin, soldered brass, etc. on larger parts and polystyrene on some small parts like winches, etc.

I am still working on the completion of all the small items, which are mainly complete for the smaller models, then completing the smaller models, then Titanic. After that I will built the Olympic. A lot of fittings for both liners are complete, built mainly from scratch, own brass etchings and resin parts. Actually I am working to cast some parts in tin like anchors, ventilator motors and the Welin davits. I will show you some small items from time to time with some description, before starting with the assembly.

In the three photographs below you see models for the Hall anchors (5, 8, 11, 15,5 tons from left to right) to cast in tin. The 5 and 11 ton I do not need now, the 8 and 15,5 tons are for Olympic and Titanic.

The bridge fronts (with extended wing cabs) show the curvature beginning at the outer bridge front windows.

The rudder shows the larger zinc stripe of Olympic (or Titanic, if you will) since March 1912 (see Simon Mills Books RMS Olympic and HMHS Britannic showing broader zinc stripes than Olympic's in 1911: Olympic March 1912 with missing propeller blade in dock, Britannic on the stocks).

I have edited this post and added two more pictures. These older ones show the Titanic with some sort of diorama (I have some gray hairs now). This stuff is now packed away until the fittings for all are finished. I expext to be busy for another ten years for the completion of the models.

Best regards,

Michael

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Replies to this topic
RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Axim de Ryme, May 23rd 2014, #1
RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, May 23rd 2014, #2
      RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Jason King, May 23rd 2014, #3
           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, May 26th 2014, #4
           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jun 11th 2014, #5
                RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Dave Abate, Jun 11th 2014, #6
                     RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jun 12th 2014, #7
                     RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jul 18th 2014, #8
                          RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Britannic-Specialist, Jul 18th 2014, #9
                               RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, William W. Young, Jul 18th 2014, #10
                                    RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jul 21st 2014, #11
                                         RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, christophe, Jul 26th 2014, #12
                                              RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Britannic-Specialist, Jul 26th 2014, #13
                                                   RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jul 28th 2014, #14
                                                        RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, SwiftIntruder, Aug 11th 2014, #15
                                                             RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Matt OBrien, Aug 11th 2014, #16
                                                                  RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Aug 12th 2014, #17
                                                                       RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Matt OBrien, Aug 21st 2014, #18
                                                                            RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Aug 25th 2014, #19
                                                                            RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Sep 25th 2014, #20
                                                                                 RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Dave Abate, Sep 25th 2014, #21
                                                                                      RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Oct 27th 2014, #22
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Marco Tulner, Oct 27th 2014, #23
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Dec 05th 2014, #24
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, bpread, Dec 05th 2014, #25
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Dec 05th 2014, #26
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, squalobianco, Dec 08th 2014, #27
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jan 29th 2015, #28
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, bflynn2159, Feb 05th 2015, #29
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Feb 06th 2015, #30
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, matt dew, Mar 05th 2015, #31
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Mar 06th 2015, #32
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, matt dew, Mar 06th 2015, #33
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, TRMA, Mar 18th 2015, #34
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jul 21st 2015, #35
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, bianco64squalo, Jul 22nd 2015, #36
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jul 22nd 2015, #37
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, bianco64squalo, Jul 23rd 2015, #38
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Mr.Quagmire, Jul 26th 2015, #39
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, brendan289, Aug 14th 2015, #40
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Nov 20th 2015, #41
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Mar 01st 2016, #42
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, bianco64squalo, Mar 01st 2016, #43
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Mar 01st 2016, #44
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Dave Abate, Mar 01st 2016, #45
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, matt dew, Mar 19th 2016, #46
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Pmb91181, Mar 19th 2016, #47
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Mar 21st 2016, #48
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, bianco64squalo, Mar 21st 2016, #49
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, May 23rd 2016, #50
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, William W. Young, May 25th 2016, #51
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jul 14th 2016, #52
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, William W. Young, Jul 20th 2016, #53
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, rschin2, Jul 21st 2016, #54
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Jul 22nd 2016, #55
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Dec 22nd 2016, #56
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Shipmodeler, Feb 06th 2017, #57
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Feb 08th 2017, #58
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Shipmodeler, Feb 13th 2017, #59
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Shipmodeler, Feb 20th 2017, #60
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Feb 21st 2017, #61
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Shipmodeler, Feb 22nd 2017, #62
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Michael 400, Mar 02nd 2017, #63
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, Shipmodeler, Mar 02nd 2017, #64
                                                                                           RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100, William W. Young, Mar 27th 2017, #65

Axim de RymeFri May-23-14 03:40 AM
Member since Jun 22nd 2006
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#7164, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Hi!
Looks very good. Congratulations and let us know your updates please.

Best Regarsd
Axim

  

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Michael 400Fri May-23-14 04:55 AM
Member since May 19th 2014
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#7166, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 1
Fri May-23-14 08:46 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello,

these pictures relate to my former post.
The main parts of the little steamyacht Medea in 1:100 with bread and butter hull technique. Benches etched, folded, soldered, etc. for the models. I managed to upload another one: Deckchairs and wicker furniture with same procedure of folding.

Regards,

Michael

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Jason KingFri May-23-14 10:21 AM
Member since Apr 15th 2006
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#7168, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

You have some nice stuff going on there.

Jason

Jaborg 666.

  

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Michael 400Mon May-26-14 07:54 AM
Member since May 19th 2014
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#7180, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 3


          

Hello Jason,

thank you very much, enclosed are a few pictures of the funnels, etc.
I will complete all the fittings first, then the smaller models like the little steamyacht, and then it would become more interesting.
It would take a few years to complete this (your building speed is most remarkable, perhaps I need to much sleep).

Best regards,

Michael

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Michael 400Wed Jun-11-14 04:59 AM
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#7205, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 3


          

Hello all,

I uploaded a few more detail pictures.
They show the making of one outer propeller,
the propellers of Titanic and Olympic (1913),
the Welin davits I want to cast in tin
and some etched brass benches and chairs.

If Olympic in 1913 had a three bladed propeller it would have looked like this (the 3 blades are about 33% broader than 4 blades to get the same total surface at about the same diameter). The outer propellers have cast steel bosses, not yet painted red, as this question is still open (maybe the cast steel boss was zinc coated, we don't know).

Regards,

Michael


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Dave AbateWed Jun-11-14 09:53 AM
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#7206, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

Hello Michael

Welcome aboard TRMA. Your work is excellent and vary detailed. The deck chairs, tables and benches are nice to look at. Great detail on the propellers also. Thank you for showing your work


Dave Abate

  

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Michael 400Thu Jun-12-14 02:44 AM
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#7209, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 6


          

Hello Dave,

thank you for the very nice comment.

The way I am working on these models is a bit unusual:
I started with the main parts of the Titanic years ago.
As new information was flowing in constantly, I decided to finish Titanic the last and build some smaller models between.
So I am working on all the fittings for all models parallel, then finishing the smaller ones first.
I have build a second set of fittings for Olympic (with differences, of course, as the screws, the 68 lifeboats, etc.).
The Olympic will be lighted and I will build the hull of it after the others are finished.

As the research at this TRMA site and others is rather complete now regarding Olympic and Titanic, I can go full steam ahead now.
The lifeboats are casted in resin, I have finished the etched parts and I hope, it will work to cast the Davits, etc. in tin, as I need a lot of them.
Then I will have all the fittings complete and can start with the subassemblies and models.

This is, why I have a lot of matchbox-size photographs, but not a plated hull, for example. I have added another five pictures here.
Thanks again.

Best regards,

Michael

By the way, do any people of the TRMA met in real life, in Europe for example?



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Michael 400Fri Jul-18-14 05:02 AM
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#7316, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 6


          

Hello,

enclosed are pictures of the hulls of my other smaller models in scale 1:100. It will be interesting for modelbuilders building hulls from 0,50 to 1,50 m length in some variation of the bread and butter system to save time and effort compared to traditional plank on frame hulls.

It all starts with a center section/side view in plywood (with the stem or rudder, etc. in metal, if necessary). The material on both sides can be build up with longitudinal frame sections (as shown with the yellow/green hull), width sections (as shown with the wooden hulls) or height sections taken from decks or lines plans (not shown). It ends with the continuous upper deck glued on the hull with thickened epoxy resin in the correct sheer.

The yellow/green hull (styrodur foam) will be laminated with some layers of epoxy resin/glass fibre. The wooden hulls are soaked up with epoxy resin to get a hard surface for finish/sanding.

The completed models will be explained later, when finished.

Regards,

Michael

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Britannic-SpecialistFri Jul-18-14 11:33 AM
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#7317, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 8


          

This is very lovely! I love the propellers, how did you make them?
Some say it is possible that Titanic had a 3 bladed center propeller, because Olympic had a 4 bladed one in 1911, and if they wanted to know which would be more effective, they would put a 3 blade on Titanic. This could be why a 3 blade was fitted to Olympic temporarily, because they never had enough time to test in on Titanic.

Good luck!

Colin

If there was ever a ship with the thing called "soul" the Mauretania did.
-F.D.Roosevelt

  

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William W. YoungFri Jul-18-14 04:28 PM
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#7318, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 9


          

Michael,
I am enjoying your posts with photos very much. Your work is excellent and I find your explanation of your building process most interesting. Look like You have Harland and Wolff in miniature going on there.
Sincerely , Bill Young
Gainesville , Georgia USA

William W. Young

  

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Michael 400Mon Jul-21-14 05:38 AM
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#7320, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 10


          

Hello William and Colin,

Harland & Wolff in miniature is funny. Unfortunately my building progress is to slow for that, as I am building one thing after another, but at least I am making progress.

The screws are soldered with a steel hub, brass fairwater cap, brass blade bases, blades bend of 1 mm brass and steel screws as shown in pictures above. The problem is to control the heat, which worked well after some tryings, otherwise it could be cemented with 5 Minute Epoxy glue also.

Next things to show are the anchors, ventilator motors and welin davit parts to cast in pewter (tin) with silicone moulds, if that works well.

Enclosed are photographs of "Hells kitchen" (brass etching), the making of silicone rubber molds with plastiline, etc. for lifeboats in resin and anchors, etc. in pewter. Beside this etching and casting the rest is normal scratch building with wood, glass fibre epoxy resin, brass and some smaller parts build in Polystyrol.

Regards,

Michael

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christopheSat Jul-26-14 12:14 PM
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#7340, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 11


  

          

Wonderful work, has all the levels.

  

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Britannic-SpecialistSat Jul-26-14 10:34 PM
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#7341, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 12


          

So, you MADE the molds? I find that one of the most impressive features on this forum.

Colin

If there was ever a ship with the thing called "soul" the Mauretania did.
-F.D.Roosevelt

  

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Michael 400Mon Jul-28-14 05:43 AM
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#7346, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 13
Thu Sep-25-14 05:55 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello,

the making of silicone rubber moulds with a wooden box, plastiline, master parts (lifeboat, anchor, davit frame, davit arm, davit gear, ventilator motors) is relatively easy. For the pewter (tin) castings the moulding of a sprue and air ducts are necessary (as shown in former pictures).

The first castings in pewter (tin) of the anchors and ventilator motors worked well, see picture below. The lifeboat is resin cast. The figures are Preiser scale 1:100, the women are modified with dresses to the bottom.

I will show more pictures here in a few weeks, when the more complicated davits are finished.

Hello all,

I have edited this post after casting all the required parts in pewter (tin). To cast the davit gear was rather easy. The davit arms and davit frames wouldn't work from the start. After some experiments with tin alloys, etc. I modified the mould with a razor blade at some areas that wouldn't fill completely. Then it worked well, if the pewter (tin) was hot enough. On the photo below it has a silver color, after more heating it gets a yellow, then blue oxidation, then this oxide must be removed with a wooden stick before casting the parts. As you see in the picture the equipment is very simple, no electric oven, no centricast machine, etc. Warning: the handling of a small open fire with firelighters, wood, a gasburner, etc. and molten metal requires precaution! Not every casting is perfect, as you see in the pictures, so one need to cast some more parts by melting down the faulty parts.

In general, I think, these pewter (tin) castings worked rather well and quick to get sturdy parts. Otherwise I had to cast them in resin (davit arms rather brittle), built them all from scratch, in styrene or with brass etchings (which must be designed), or get them 3D-printed (which requires 3D-Data, etc.).

Now I have to file and finish the parts, which will require some time.

Regards,

Michael

Hello again,

to update this thread: here is a photo of the nearly finished anchors.

Regards,

Michael

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SwiftIntruderMon Aug-11-14 09:00 PM
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#7363, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 14


          

That is some wonderful work you have shared with us. I find it amazing the craftsmanship that so many people possess and share with all of us who frequent this forum. Again, wonderful work! Keep us posted.

Jim

  

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Matt OBrienMon Aug-11-14 09:57 PM
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#7364, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 15
Mon Aug-11-14 09:58 PMby Matt OBrien

  

          

I completely agree. It's one thing to put together a pre-molded kit....but it becomes a whole different ball game when YOU are the one creating the molds (and working in metal, no less).

Can't wait to see more.

Matt

  

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Michael 400Tue Aug-12-14 04:49 AM
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#7365, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 16


          

Thank you,

Matt and Jim, for the very nice comments.
I have seen your post

http://titanic-model.com/dc/dcboard.php?az=show_topic&forum=123&topic_id=5842&mode=full

regarding your 1:350 Titanic. These detailed etched windows, deck chairs, your scratch build soldered brass masts, the planking of the decks, etc. require even more skill and patience to build them so clean than to build them in a larger scale with own etchings, castings, etc.

Some other scratchbuilders here also made their own molds for resin cast bollards, etc. (like Jason King, as I remember from his posts). The main difference between resin and pewter (tin) casting is, that you need heat resitant silicone. With my molds for pewter (tin) casting I could also cast in resin, which flows more easily, if pewter doesn't fill the mold.

I will add one other picture in the above posting with the filed and finished parts, when all the excess metal on these parts is removed, which is a bit boring in every sense of the word (I also have to drill holes in the davit arms, etc.).

Best regards,

Michael

  

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Matt OBrienThu Aug-21-14 03:33 AM
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#7397, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 17
Thu Aug-21-14 04:33 AMby Matt OBrien

  

          

Thank you for the compliment, Michael. I guess we are now the newest members of the "Mutual Admiration Society", heh heh. I think that those of you who work with the larger scales have no room for error. ANY little "problem" is easily noticable, therefore your skills need to be spot on. At 1/350, I can hide a multitude of sins, sometimes even with photography. But the large scales, like you and Jason do, could potentially show every little flaw or mistake (although I've yet to see ANY). Pulling that off shows the true skill involved.

I've never scratch-built anything before this build began. I have learned quite a bit from the members of this site and I'm always willing and waiting for more to learn. A couple of successes can really boost one's confidence and the mistakes are just part of the process. I don't know if I will EVER take my model building to the level of casting my own parts...but never say "Never", right?

I have a Chris Craft from Dumas that needs all new deck fittings. The kit supplied parts are so poorly cast they're almost unusable. One option is to just buy new ones from Dumas... but the other option would be to try my hand at casting the parts. It would be a fun challenge and the upside is that the "new" parts might be better detailed.

I look forward to your next post...

Matt

  

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Michael 400Mon Aug-25-14 05:00 AM
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#7407, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 18


          

Thank you Matt and all the others,

for the nice comments.
While still filing, scratching and drilling on the davit arms and frames over the next two weeks, I will make an update on that later.

As mentioned, I believe the effort of painting deckchairs, etc. in scale 1:350 or so is even bigger than in 1:100. After all, some modelmakers build at these scales for many years until now like myself in scale 1:100.

This thread will go over the next several years until all is finished.
Here are a few pictures of the equipment for the Titanic Southampton dock build over the years, using parts from several sources, etc. which will have to wait still a more few years until installation.

Best regards,

Michael

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Michael 400Thu Sep-25-14 06:40 AM
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#7527, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 18
Mon Oct-27-14 04:08 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello,

regarding the anchor sizes I started a little discussion in this thread:

http://titanic-model.com/dc/dcboard.php?az=show_topic&forum=100&topic_id=50637&mode=full

Here are the finished anchors and ventilator motors:

The little motors are the motors for the 20" vents,
the big ones are for the 30"/35" vents (I made one casting as the sizes didn't differ very much, see TTSM 1).

The five big anchors are the about 16 tons centre anchors, the six small ones (above) are the about 8 tons side anchors, the three middle sized (left) are 10 to 12 tons anchors (used on Lusitania, Mauretania, Aquitania, Imperator class and I think Olympic after 1920 (after the different looking Samuel Taylors & Sons type Dreadnaught 9/11 tons side anchors installed on Britannic and Olympic in Februar 1914)).

Sizes in scale 1:100 (incl. shackle):
16 tons: 32 mm x 56 mm
8 tons: 27 mm x 47 mm
10 to 12 tons: 29 mm x 51 mm

Here is the update with the davit parts and the assembled Welin davits, glued with 10-minute-epoxy or soldered together. Since there are a lot of types of parts, the question was, which to be made from the same tool by modification (you see this in the photos). The double acting davits are the first installed on Olympic and Titanic in 1911/12. The single acting davits with shorter frames are the additional davits installed on Olympic in 1913.

Best regards,

Michael



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Dave AbateThu Sep-25-14 09:21 AM
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#7528, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 20


  

          

Michael

Thanks for showing the details of your work. Your build is one to watch.

Dave Abate

  

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Michael 400Mon Oct-27-14 04:21 AM
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#7566, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 21
Fri Dec-05-14 04:28 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello all,

thanks for your interest in my work.
Here are two more pictures of the assembled davits.

Regarding Marco's funny comment (below):
The models will be built as display models with no moving parts, but with a lot of figures, deckchairs, deck games, etc.

The davits are finished as you see in the photographs. The slots in the davit frames (master models, see above) could not be casted in the chosen pewter casting technique. However, the shorter single action davit frames, installed on Olympic in 1913, I think, didn't have these slots, as other single action Welin Davit frames on Imperator, Vaterland or Nomadic didn't have those slots. The handles are painted black and positioned as shown in Titanic in Photographs, page 134. By the way, Brian Hawleys RMS Olympic, page 112, shows dark handles too, but in another stowing position.

The lifeboats for Olympic (1913), Titanic and other models are finished, too.

Best regards,

Michael

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Marco TulnerMon Oct-27-14 11:14 AM
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#7567, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 22


  

          

These are very good. I am impressed.
Biggest question that just came up to me; will these be working (miniature) davits?

Regards,
Marco Tulner

  

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Michael 400Fri Dec-05-14 04:08 AM
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#7722, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 23
Wed Jan-28-15 10:24 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello all,

here are the bollards (20 non ventilating 16 inch diameter, 8 ventilating 16 inch diameter plus 4 reserve, 20 ventilating 19 inch diameter), according to TTSM 1 and Bob Read's posting answer.

All the winches for Olympic (1913) and Titanic: 6 steam winches, 8 large electric winches, 6 boat winches for Olympic (1913) plus 1 reserve, 4 smaller boat winches for Titanic plus 1 reserve. See my questions, Bob Reads and Ralph Currell posts in the research forum regarding the colors of the steam winches and the sizes of the boat winches.

I added one picture of 190 figures before painting them (Preiser 74090 in scale 1:100). I modified them: the women with long dresses of 2k acrylic glue, most persons with hats stamped of polystyrene sheet, some figures shortened from 19 mm to 17.5 mm, etc.

Edit Jan. 28, 2015:
Hello all,

I added two pictures, below:

All the fairleads, low rollers and pedestal rollers for 400 and 401 (with "cement" unpainted). There is one little thing for further research: If you compare Bob Reads drawing regarding the pedestal roller posted about Christmas in Filippos 1:144 thread you may wonder about the strange baseplate of them in my photograph. It is modeled after TTSM 1, page 494, Fig. 21-31 (which was taken from a H&W GA deck plan I believe). To file the columns somewhat sleeker and the baseplate circular could be done later.

And the modified Preiser 74090 in scale 1:100 painted.

Regards,

Michael

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bpreadFri Dec-05-14 12:09 PM
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#7723, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 24


          

Hi Michael:
You may be the first modeler to paint the bodies of the steam winches green. Congratulations!

Regards,
Bob Read
TRMA trustee

  

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Michael 400Fri Dec-05-14 01:48 PM
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#7724, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 25
Wed Jan-28-15 10:22 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello Bob,

thank you very much for the nice comment.
I have seen the green steam winches with black drums first on the H&W yard model of RMS Majestic (or Teutonic) of 1889 in the UFTM in 1998.

I will fill up this post and the above each with 5 pictures in a few weeks.

Hello Filippo,

thank you for your nice comment (below), I will show more details until everything will be complete for assembling the models.

Best regards,

Michael

Edit Jan. 28, 2015:
Hello all,

currently I am modifying several of the figures I already have, about 750 including the above, which will take some further weeks, before going on with OLympic's/Titanic's parts.

Therefore 5 pictures of some of Titanic's Southampton dock equipment, all built in scale 1:100 using a broad range of sources, kits or parts. Before all this will be installed in a few years I will have to finish Titanic and the dock assembly.

Please look at my above post from Dec. 5, 2014 too, with two added pictures.

Best regards,

Michael





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squalobiancoMon Dec-08-14 11:50 PM
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#7728, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 26


          

Hi Michael,
excellent work, astounding details....
I see in advance for more items...
Congratulations.
Filippo

  

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Michael 400Thu Jan-29-15 04:31 AM
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#7887, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 27


          

Hello all,

regarding the pier cranes, gangways, automobiles, horse carriages, trains, etc. shown above, a few pictures of the building process might be interesting. I built all that stuff parallel to the ship models over quite a few years.

Pier cranes, gangways: scratch built using polystyrene sheet, profiles, etc., dimensions taken from TTSM 2, pages 9, 10, etc. and photographs.

Automobiles, carriages: some scratch built, some built from kits, some bought from car collectors and modified, etc., the most curious source: some "Kinder surprise eggs" from Ferrero from the 70ties and 80ties contained quite good historical automobiles in about 1:100 scale.

Trains: the British 3mm society offers for members parts and kits to build more or less scratch built model railways in the scale 1 foot = 3 mm = 1:101,6. I was a member of the 3mm society for some years and received very good and friendly assistance from other members regarding the parts needed to build the correct models for the Southampton dock 1912. There were no complete kits, but chassis (etched brass parts or tin castings), axles, wheels and small parts like buffers, vents, etc. from different members/suppliers to order. Some books and railway magazines with drawings were also helpful. The boat train locomotive was a LSWR T9 with 8 carriages (first class or second/third class with luggage compartment carriages at the ends, I think). "The Drummond Greyhounds of the LSWR" from D. L. Bradley is a good book about the T9. The other locomotives are a LSWR B4 dock tank and a LSWR 700 class.

(By the way, I believe, there is also a 2mm association in England (scale 1:152) and the scale 1 foot = 4 mm = 1:76 is also quite common in the UK for model railways.)

The above two posts from Dec. 5 are also updated with 5 pictures.

Please let me know, if I should make about one or two more posts regarding the dock, before concentrating on the building of the missing parts of Olympic and Titanic in the next months.

Best regards,

Michael




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bflynn2159Thu Feb-05-15 07:48 PM
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#7904, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 28


  

          

Michael, definitely post as much as you can! This model is going to be gorgeous so as many updates as you can would be great!

Enjoy!
--Brian Flynn

  

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Michael 400Fri Feb-06-15 05:52 AM
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#7905, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 29


          

Hello Brian,

thank you for your nice comment.
By the way, as explained in the first posts somewhat, I will give an overview for all readers, what I have done already and I am currently working on. You may be interested in the fact, that I have also built the 1:350 kits of Titanic and Lusitania some 18 years ago, rather crude, with no etched parts or painted window frames, etc.

But now I am working in scale 1:100 as illustrated in these posts:
1. RMS Titanic diorama, berth 44 of Southampton Dock, with buildings, railway, tugs.
2. RMS Olympic (1913), illuminated with fibre optics.
3. Smaller ships, yachts, the Traffic, etc., about 1912, as separate models.

I started with the Titanic 1998 to 2000, but delayed it for some years due to permanent upgrade of Titanic research details of this site, meanwhile (2000 to 2008) building the dock with sheds, buildings, cranes, London and South Western Railway (LSWR) equipment, the six tugs, etc... Later (2008 to 2011) I built hulls (bread and butter system), as shown in this post earlier, for the smaller ships like yachts, the Traffic, etc. about 1912, as separate models, also including all the fitting parts for them. From 2011 until now I am building a second set of fitting parts for Olympic and missing parts for Titanic (masts, funnels, lifeboats (PUR-castings), all davits (Tin-castings), etched deckchairs, etc.).

Always keen to do the most uninspiring work first, I am currently finishing the modifications on the 850 to 900 figures already bought for these models. Then I will build the sirocco vents and some other missing parts for the Olympic and Titanic and the dock. Then I will finish the smaller ships and the RMS Titanic diorama. After that I will built the illuminated hull for the RMS Olympic (1913) and will finish it with the already finished fitting parts.

After that lengthy procedure, I hope, I will cured of that hefty model building virus, after all. As you may know, most of these larger projects are shelved some years later due to taking to long time or changed living circumstances, with some exceptions, of course, like Jason's RMS Titanic's. If somebody could be motivated or re-motivated with his own projects due to this thread, would be great.

I will show some more illustrative photos of the work already done and the further development (after getting these 850 figures off the table).

Best regards,

Michael

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matt dewThu Mar-05-15 03:36 PM
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#7994, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 30


          

Hi Michael. Your work is absolutely beautiful, with all the different processes you use for fabrication of parts. Makes me feel like a beginner!! I was wondering how you generated the heavily riveted plates on C and D deck. I have been experimenting with Peters technique, punching the back of the plates and then ironing them flat. Im not having the best results that way, maybe because of the scale (1:100 opposed to 1:48) Im working with. Keeping the rivet heads fine and consistent in size and spacing very difficult. When I saw the pic of the plates on this thread I was staggered how accurate , flat and consistent they looked. Did you cast them from a master? Any info would be gratefully appreciated. Regards Matt (Dew)

  

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Michael 400Fri Mar-06-15 06:52 AM
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#7995, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 31
Thu Mar-19-15 04:44 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello Matt,

thank you very much for the compliment.

The riveted plates in scale 1:100 are etched brass, 0.5 mm thick, etched to 0.3 mm thickness with rivets of 0.2 mm height. As these plates will be painted black on the models I have chemically blackened them to reduce primer and paint (I have done the same with teak deckchairs or other brass parts to be painted in dark colors). These "hydraulically riveted" brass plates of the sheer strake and all the other plates will be glued on the glass-reinforced epoxy hull with 2K-epoxy glue. Before that I will stamp the portholes in with a simple stamping tool. The "hand riveted" plates with no visible rivets will be of coated paper, about 0.2 mm thick, which is used for postcards, photos, etc. ("Chromolux"-paper used also on the white Olympic funnel photos).

Here are two pictures of the unpainted telegraphs and wheel pedestals in brass. By the way, the bollards, fairleads, rollers, winches, pier cranes and platforms shown before are scratch built from styrene plastics.

I will fill up this comment with three more photographs asap, but now I am a bit bored by painting/repainting 850 styrene (and a few tin) figures, which I modified in outfit and/or to 1:100 scale, before starting again more interesting parts for Olympic and Titanic.

Edit 1, March 6, 2015:
Matt,
thinking about your above methods to make plates in 1:48 scale, which will be of 0.5 mm material thickness plus about 0.3 mm rivet heads. Brass etching with 0.8 mm brass sheet metal is not possible. Even in 1:100 it was not very economical for two ships, it produced quite a few gallons of acid liquid (plus the etched parts). Making them in 1:48 scale with 0.5 mm polystyrene like Peter makes sense.

About some of my own material guidelines for scratchbuilding in regard to your problem:
I use polystyrene or other thermoplastics for small solid parts of about 20 mm size like winches, bollards, etc. which will be build up with the right thermoplastic solvent glue, like UHU Allplast or Revell liquid glue. The finished parts will be glued with UHU Allplast or Stabilit Express to an unpainted wooden deck. Building larger kits completely of polystyrene is also a good method. I avoid polystyrene in combination with wood, for larger parts, and in combination with metal, whenever possible (except for very small parts like stanchions, etc.). Peters 1:48 Titanic superstructure housings are made of polysyrene and wood backing, but not glued together as far as I have read his methods in his book. This is also a good method, because polystyrene or other thermoplastics have a larger thermal expansion than wood, etc. and need room to breathe.

What alternatives to "hydraulically riveted" 0.5 mm polystyrene plates are advisable? Not much. My coated paper method, about 0.2 mm thick, which is used for postcards, photos, etc. works also with Peters riveting method (see my Olympic's funnel seams). Maybe you try 0.5 mm thick drawing paper cardboard from a hobby painting store and impregnate/glue this with Epoxy glue onto a wooden or glass reinforced epoxy hull (the cardboard will be soaked making the rivets very stiff). Make some tests with styrene and drawing paper and different glues. See Filippos 1:144 thread with Bob Reads advice regarding the plating. Good luck, building the Titanic in 1:48 scale is a very huge and long project.

Edit 2, March 17, 2015:
As mentioned above, here are three photographs to complete this post.
First, the "crew" for my models, including Captain Smith of the Titanic, Captain Haddock of the 1913 Olympic and Violet Jessop (in sailing day trouble handling huge quantities of flowers). Second some automobiles, persons (porter and bellboy of the South Western Hotel, etc.), fairleads, pedestal rollers (changed to round base plates, as discussed with Bob Read in the research forum). And third, my tools (from a sewing equipment shop) to stamp in rivets in chromolux paper (or polystyrene, if you prefer) as an idea for Matt and others (I used it for the funnel seams of Olympic, etc.).

Edit 3, March 19, 2015:
I agree to the new forum rules (below).
As I prefer a more condensed thread, the readers should expect posts with 5 pictures every 12 weeks, because my projects cover several years. This makes 20 pictures per year for some years to come. The 80 pictures already shown since 2014 cover some of the work from 1998 to 2014. It is hard to show something new every month (I work at the modification of 850 figures since Christmas, for example). Progress photos will be limited to some interesting or different building techniques as examples, or otherwise finished models photographs will be preferred.

So, expect 4 picture posts per year (without later editing).
In 2015 I will complete many of the outfitting parts for Olympic and Titanic (glass domes, ventilators, cranes).

Best regards,

Michael

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matt dewFri Mar-06-15 08:11 PM
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#7996, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 32


          

Hi Michael
Thankyou so much for the information.I am infact building 1:100, my reference to 1:48 was Peters build. Sorry about the confusion.
I have used .015" HIP styrene for my plating. The gauge is 50% heavier than it should be, because I wanted to pronounce the platework, hopefully without losing an authentic scale representation. The shear strake is proving a bit problematic probably because of the plate thickness and scale (in other words .010" styrene would have been less cupped once "riveted")
Your use of card appeals to me. I remember Chromolux , my uncle was a printer, he used that stock for business cards. I will try that first, as brass etching is out of my depth, plus if I tried to start a Hells Kitchen , my wife would kill me!
You mentioned thermal expansion differences between thermoplastics and wood, being a potential problem. My hull is plywood, frame(1/4") and sheathing(2mm). Hopefully with the HIPS plating I wont get any problems.I used a mitrebond (superglue) for adhesion, and MEK for the landings(plate to plate) .
I will get into metal castings ,after seeing your work, it is so inspiring. When I started this build I thought it would be nice to cast the props and anchors in metal. I may attack the davits as well, we'll see.
Thanks again for your help Michael.
Cheers for now, Matt.

  

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TRMAWed Mar-18-15 07:18 AM
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#8069, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 33


          

Please read the new Forum rules:
http://titanic-model.com/dc/dcboard.php?az=show_mesg&forum=123&topic_id=8066&mesg_id=8066&page=

TRMA Moderator

  

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Michael 400Tue Jul-21-15 06:09 AM
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#8429, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 34


          

Hello all,

I think, it is time for an update. My last highlight was a Belfast holiday in April, the rest is modeling practice of never ending detail parts, the finished figures (some are shown above), etc.

I build up new glass domes, made of 1 mm clear PVC, warmed up 3 to 5 minutes at about 175 degree (Celsius) in an old electric baking oven and drawn over wooden "mushroom" tools of the fore and aft domes of Olympic/Titanic. The clear PVC domes are cut and sanded blind inside and outside (for glueing). The flat 0,3 mm brass etched "iron" domes are bend over the PVC domes and mushroom tools and soldered at the outer segments, then etched black, washed with water, soap, clear water and Aceton, then glued with 10 minute clear 2K-Epoxy over the PVC domes, then sanded or scraped for more layers of 10 minute clear 2K-Epoxy to get a smooth outer surface for laquering with clear gloss Polyurethane laquer (UV-Protection). The Titanic will be not lighted, so I may put little mirrors under the inside blinded domes to reflect outer light. The Olympic (1913/14) will be lighted from the inside of the ship with fibre optics.

I hope, it is interesting and enjoying.
There are more parts to complete, before assembling the models.

Best regards,

Michael

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bianco64squaloWed Jul-22-15 06:59 AM
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#8431, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 35


          

Wonderful work, Michael, a pleasure for eyes....
Five stars....

  

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Michael 400Wed Jul-22-15 09:10 AM
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#8432, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 36


          

Hi Filippo,

thank you very much, your shellplating is also five stars, indeed.
This will take me many months on my models, I am afraid.

I will fill up this post with five pictures in a few weeks to explain the windows (Laser copied, for the unlighted Titanic on paper, for the lighted Olympic on the usual foil, which is always PET = Polyethylentherephthalate or thermoplastic Polyester, which is very hard to glue properly). I will explain my solution for that after some glueing tests.

Best regards,

Michael

  

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bianco64squaloThu Jul-23-15 05:20 AM
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#8435, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 37


          

Hi Michael,
thanks for your kind words...
If you want, for bypassing the limits in the number of photos that you can post on the site, you can post the name of your personal site, if you have one, or post some photos on my personal mail:
filippo@saracostruzioni.eu.
Thanks in advance.
Filippo

  

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Mr.QuagmireSun Jul-26-15 10:40 AM
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#8439, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 35


          

They look very nice! Interesting to see the domes by themselves.

Colin

  

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brendan289Fri Aug-14-15 07:23 AM
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#8468, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 39


          

I'M almost crying with excitement! !!!!!!
These girls will be absolutely amazing,truly and utterly scratchbuilt.
Awesome.

  

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Michael 400Fri Nov-20-15 03:49 AM
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#8612, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 40
Fri Nov-20-15 03:56 AMby Michael 400

          

Hi all,

after some extensive glueing experiments regarding Olympic's windows here is the concept: Olympic's and Titanic's windows are drawn in scale 1/25 and laser-copied to 1/100, for Titanic on paper, for Olympic on the usual 0.15 mm laser-copy-foil, which is hard to glue (PET = polyethylentherepthalate or thermoplastic polyester). These foil windows will be glued between 0.2 mm clear sheat PVC, and these 0.6 mm PVC windows then glued on the wooden walls inside, outside the brass window frames will be glued to these PVC windows, all with specially chosen and tested glues. The concept of the two models became clear by comparing the photographs attached to this post.

So, scratch building these two "girls" is a lenghty procedure, which will keep me busy for some more years. I think, it makes sense to make a longer break and show the finished products sometimes later.

Best regards,

Michael




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Michael 400Tue Mar-01-16 03:28 AM
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#8781, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 40
Tue Mar-01-16 04:20 AMby Michael 400

          

Hi all,

after registering, that my posts here still received a few more clicks, while I have not posted something new in the last months, here are some more details of some parts I have made for Olympic and Titanic. I will start assembling these large models not before all attachment parts will be completed (and the smaller models finished), which makes it a bit boring for myself to build and yourself to watch.

The crows nests and bulwarks are made of 0.2 mm brass, folded, etc., the bulwarks are one sheet metal piece, the curvature is build up with solder. The pipes of Titanic's water tank are clearly documented (TTSM 1, etc.). Olympic had two tanks (at least in 1911), the port one had a funnel pipe to increase hydraulic pressure, so it would have made sense, to connect the port and starboard tank to get the same water pressure. The soldered compass platforms will be shown in the next post.

Best regards,

Michael

P.S.: I need a comment after posting two posts with five pictures per post to go forward every few months.

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bianco64squaloTue Mar-01-16 04:02 AM
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#8782, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 42


          

Hi Michael,
I exactly wondered when you wuold have posted some new photos...
Excellent work, as usual...I envy your craftmanship with metals...
Fantastic !!!!!

  

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Michael 400Tue Mar-01-16 05:05 AM
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#8783, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 43
Tue Mar-01-16 05:11 AMby Michael 400

          

Hi Filippo,

thank you for your kind words.

I have a bit more to show, what I have build up the last months.
But for the next post with five pictures I will wait some weeks/months, because I do not want to overstretch this site and show some reasonable progress (the 16 cranes, all sirocco vents, etc.).

The soldered and painted compass platforms made of the parts shown in the last picture of the last post. The lettering is hardly visible.
The finished forward dome covers and Titanic's Second Class Boat Deck Entrance.
The consensus seems to be, that Titanic's steam wheel pillars were black (maybe iron castings), while Olympic's were brass.
Titanic's skylights with laser color copy windows, Olympic's with etched brass frames to show some light from inside.

Best regards,

Michael


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Dave AbateTue Mar-01-16 06:15 AM
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#8785, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 44


  

          

Looks good Michael. Keep up the great work.

Dave Abate

  

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matt dewSat Mar-19-16 08:28 AM
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#8827, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 45
Sat Mar-19-16 02:10 PMby matt dew

          

Hi Michael

Lovely work mate!
I'm still soldiering away on plating and decks.
Your metal fabrication is incredible.

Regards

Matt Dew

  

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Pmb91181Sat Mar-19-16 03:48 PM
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#8831, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 46


          

Amazing work! I look forward to see more of it.

Patrick

  

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Michael 400Mon Mar-21-16 05:31 AM
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#8840, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 47
Mon May-23-16 07:53 AMby Michael 400

          

Hi all,

thank you for the nice comments, Dave, Matt and Patrick.
I will fill up this post with five pictures in a few weeks, when I have something new to show.
By the way, I also work in Polystyrene for smaller, solid parts (the winches, bollards, etc.).
But I have a passion for brass soldering, plywood, etc.
There are endless material solutions for different parts, so it is interesting to see the different ideas from other scratch builders.

By the way, most builders, like myself on Titanic, start with the hull, and then work on all the detail parts.
For Olympic I will start the hull, when all parts for Olympic and Titanic will be finished, to avoid two monsters standing unfinished around in the "shipyard" for years.

Hi Filippo,

thank you for your interest in my work (regarding your comment below).
To prevent a misunderstanding, this is the only internet link, where my work on my shipmodels is shown and described.

My Titanic model (with the Southampton dock diorama described above) is also not completed yet, as the Olympic and some smaller yachts, etc., all in scale 1:100.
However I have all the parts for these models nearly complete, apart from some Olympic/Titanic parts I still have to build this year (the cranes, sirocco vents, completion of the funnels).

I will complete the smaller models from next year on, than the Titanic diorama, after that the illuminated Olympic from 1913.

I will use your post below to answer as soon as possible with new pictures, but the 16 Stothert & Pitt cranes for Olympic and Titanic are very time consuming.

Best regards,

Michael

May 23, 2016:
Hi all,

as promised above, here are five new pictures:
The 16 capstans and 4 anchor windlasses for Olympic and Titanic.
The capstans are turned from brass, chemically blackened and polished blank at the topside, the "Napier Brothers Limited Engineers Glasgow" sign was glued on later (laser copy). The 8 cranes for Titanic rebuilt to the latest information from TTSM 1, etc. and the 8 cranes for Olympic build new. The inner latticework and the doors are brass etched, the outer I-profiles are 2,5 x 1,5 mm brass profiles, the bases are plywood, the plating is coated paper, all glued with 2K-Epoxy. As I already had to rebuild the 8 Titanic cranes, to cast parts for "only" 8 Olympic cranes made no sense, but the making and reworking was very time consuming. The crane jib crutches are made from brass and soldered. As the cranes were built in the working configuration, the turnbuckles are hanging down.

Best regards,

Michael

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bianco64squaloMon Mar-21-16 06:05 AM
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#8841, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 48


          

Hi Michael,
wonderful details...
I definitely agree with your choice to star the hull when all the details of superstrutures will be finished...
This choice will allow to you non to have a finished hull exposed to dust and possible damages...
Compliments for your work...
An answer: can you post the link for your Titanic already builted ?
Cheers.
Filippo

  

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Michael 400Mon May-23-16 08:51 AM
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#8928, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 49


          

Hi all,

here is another post with five pictures to show some other things, that may be interesting to some model builders: The anchor cranes are made in brass and soldered. The 4 masts for Olympic and Titanic are made as follows: a 1 mm brass nail (mast head) and a 1 mm brass thread glued in a 2 mm brass tube with Epoxy resin, then glued in a 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm and 6 mm brass tube, wrapped with glass reinforced Epoxy resin to 10 mm Diameter at the base and sanded to the correct shape. The 3 smaller masts for the 1889 HAPAG liner Augusta Victoria in scale 1:100 (the yellow/green hull shown above in picture 30) are made in the same way without the glass reinforced Epoxy resin wrapping. By the way, the inhalation of sanding dust, especially from glass reinforced Epoxy resin, etc. must be avoided! As I mentioned in my Fri Dec-05-14 04:28 post with the picture of all the lifeboats for Olympic (1913), Titanic and other models here are two detail pictures of Olympic's (1913) lifeboats. Most of them were cast in resin, as described in my above posts in 2014.

I have a few other lenghty things to complete like the funnel piping, and the sirocco vents, so the next post with five pictures will be in autumn.

Best regards,

Michael

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William W. YoungWed May-25-16 05:24 PM
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#8930, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 50


          

Beautiful work. I always look forward to your posts.

William W. Young

  

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Michael 400Thu Jul-14-16 06:35 AM
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#8965, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 51
Fri Jul-15-16 04:46 AMby Michael 400

          

Hi William,

thanks for your comment, appreciated, I hope, you may get some motivation and enough time to build your own Olympic in scale 1:144. Here is an update with more parts, I built and/or reworked to the latest research:

The breakwaters of Olympic and Titanic, Titanic's with one sign on starboard, Olympic's with two signs and additional profiles fixed horizontal at the stays (the two signs and horizontal profiles appear and disappear, the latter also vary in length/position, during Olympic's career, maybe I remove the signs and/or cut the profiles befor painting, as shown in Brian Hawley's, RMS Olympic, pages 37, 101, 1912/13 photographs). No. 1 Hatch Olympic and No. 1 Hatch Cover Titanic, build to the drawing in TTSM 1 and the identical drawings from Ralph Currell posted on this site. These drawings show the angled box in front of the hatch with holes in the triangular side stays, so maybe later, I would drill little holes into the box, painted black. I wonder, if they maybe would have build the box closed, to prevent the influx of seawater into the box to prevent rust. From Brian Hawley, RMS Olympic, pages 100, 101, I see, that even in May 1912 Olympic's Hatch had the angled front cover and angled box below, and additional to Titanic, two portholes in the angled front cover and one on top of the cover between the doors. Please note the hinged bolts and slots of No. 1 hatches in the fourth photograph. The bolts seem to have been doubled at the front and sides, not at the rear, according to the drawing. The Olympic hatches No. 2, 3, 5, and 6 show the refit from 1912/13 with raised coamings, horizontal stiffeners and triangular stays (with holes in them). Reference was the drawing MT 15/504 SS Olympic 1913 posted by Ralph Currell and also some helpful photographs posted on this site. Titanic's hatches Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 are finished and look as the photographed No. 2 hatch.

There is still a lot to do on the fitting parts (the sirocco vents, completion of the funnels).

Best regards,

Michael

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William W. YoungWed Jul-20-16 08:57 PM
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#8973, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 52


          

Beautiful work , VERY impressive !

William W. Young

  

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rschin2Thu Jul-21-16 12:50 PM
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#8974, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 52


          

any update on the hull and/or superstructure?

-Robert

  

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Michael 400Fri Jul-22-16 03:15 AM
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#8975, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 54


          

Hi Robert,

I think, that readers must be bored stiff (like myself) by the timeframe 10 years of all the stuff I am building parallel (explained in the first three posts of this thread). I complete all the fitting parts for all models, before I start finishing the hulls, etc. That is, why I make longer breaks, since fitting parts are not so interesting to show. I hope, this site will be actice, when I may show the assemblies in some years.

Regards,

Michael

  

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Michael 400Thu Dec-22-16 03:38 AM
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#9231, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 55


          

Hi all,

here are some parts of my Olympic (1913) and Titanic model parts. The soldered brass parts are chemically blackened, the solder gets grey in the process. As explained before, the laser copied foil windows glued between PVC foils and the finished 2nd class Entrances for Olympic (lighted) and Titanic (laser copied paper windows glued and impregnated with resin/laquer).

I am still building some parts for the models and will assembly some smaller models before assembling Titanic and building Olympic, so there will be a long break here.

Maybe there are some others to show there assemblies meanwhile?

Merry christmas and a happy new year!

Michael

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ShipmodelerMon Feb-06-17 03:10 PM
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#9262, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 56


          

Hello Sir,

Your model's are true works of art! Very detailed. I do have a question if you don't mind? I have wanted to build a 1/96 scale model of one of the tugs that towed Titanic out of Southampton. but never have been able to find any info o them. I noticed on your photo of the tugs you are building you had plans of them. Where did you find them? I would be very appreciative if you could advise me on how to find a set.
Again Very Nice work, I'm looking foreword to seeing your next photos.

Best Regards,
Chris Davis

  

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Michael 400Wed Feb-08-17 11:43 AM
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#9263, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 57


          

Hello Chris,

thank you for your interest in my work and your very nice comment. I think, I can help you a bit further. My tug models are constructed with General Arrangement and Lines and Body plans of contemporary steam tugs printed in the excellent book from P. N. Thomas: British Steam Tugs. Waine Research, Wolverhampton, 1997, ISBN 0 905184 07 6. It contains a lot of high quality reprints of shipyard drawings from various tugs built in the UK about 1900. Here are my own notices for the Southampton tugs in service for Olympic and Titanic, mainly from this book: The tugs were from the Southampton, Isle of Wight and South of England Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, which run a passenger tender and tug service between Southampton and the Isle of Wight since 1861. The company was later known as the "Red Funnel Fleet" with red funnels with black tops. But before 1914 the company colours of the tugs were black hulls with white line, brown top and buff funnels. Some of there tugs were large tug tenders with twin screws, mast derricks to handle cargo, a small saloon and seats on deck (page 115). Their first tug tender was the Albert Edward (120 ft., 160 GRT, 100 nhp, twin screws), built 1886. Hercules was built in 1890. In 1903 the tug tender Hector joined the fleet (130 ft., 382 GRT, 1400 ihp, twin screws). Neptune had twin screws and 1600 ihp. Titanic Arrival: five Tugs, Ajax, Hector, Vulcan, Neptune, Hercules. Titanic Departure: six Tugs, Ajax, Hector, Vulcan, Neptune, Hercules, Albert Edward. My research is a few years old , so you may find more information by an actual search.

Here are two photographs of the model of the tug tender Hector and the building of them. They are made with wooden hulls, brass propellers, masts, anchor crane and funnel. I used some plastic parts from Revell kits of the "Harbour tug boat" (bollards, crew, stairs, deck and bridge houses), which fit well for 1:100 scale (the deck and bridge house were filled with solid wood for glueing, because the glueing of polystyrene to solid wood is not ideal). I have a few alterations of these models already on my To Do List, if you find more information for these Southampton tugs, please let me know.

I worked further on the completion of parts for Olympic/Titanic. A photograph with chart room furniture, deck games, separations for Cafe Parisien of Olympic 1913, potted trees for Titanic, etc., Hingley anchor transports with 16 ton centre anchors with shackles (on rail and with horses), the windlasss gear parts with 16 ton centre anchors with shackles, two 8 ton side anchors with shackles, chains for Olympic/Titanic. Below there is one 10 to 12 ton side/centre anchor with shackles, chains (size for Lusitania, Mauretania, Aquitania or Imperator/Vaterland). I find it interesting to study the weights/cable sizes from The Shipbuilder, etc.: Lusitania, Mauretania two 10 ton side anchors with 3 3/4 inch (95 mm) cable, Aquitania two 11 ton side anchors with 3 7/8 inch (98 mm) cable, Olympic 1911-13, Titanic two 8 ton side anchors with 3 3/8 inch (86 mm) cable and a 16 ton centre anchor, Imperator/Vaterland two 10 ton side anchors with 86 mm cable and a 12 ton centre anchor with 102 mm cable. The connecting links and shackles measure up to 6 1/4 inch (159 mm), the arrangement for Olympic/Titanic is: anchor, shackle, 6 1/4 inch link, 5 3/4 inch stud link, 5 3/4 inch link, shackle, 3 3/8 inch chain (or wire rope on centre anchor). The Olympic/Titanic side and centre anchors seems to have these huge connecting links of this same size, if not, the arrangement is the same and the side anchor connecting links were only a bit smaller. I find this awesome and hard to bend even in scale 1/100 from 1.5 mm brass (only the connecting links/shackles, 0.8 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.5 mm stud link brass chains are available from various suppliers).

I hope, you enjoyed the detail photos, the assembly with plating the hulls, etc., still have to wait, as I want to have all this small parts completely finished and off the table before.

Best regards,

Michael

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ShipmodelerMon Feb-13-17 07:16 PM
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#9274, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 58


          

Hello Micheal,

Thank you for the reply, and the info. Your Work is Amazing Sir, you are a true artist indeed. I like the tug hector very much. I had hoped to try to scratch build a tug like her in 1/96 scale, to go with my Titanic collection. I will have to try to find the info you mention.
living in the U.S. I'm not sure where to look for the book you mention. but I will try.

I'm really looking foreword to seeing your models completed, and look foreword to seeing more on your tugs.

Thanks Again. and calm Sea's.
Best Regards,
Chris Davis

  

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ShipmodelerMon Feb-20-17 08:35 AM
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#9282, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 58


          

Hello Michael,

I have been trying to locate that book. So far I have only seen one listing for it, but it was at a book store there in the UK. I have found nothing here in the States. even the library don't have it. So I'm still searching.

Have you worked on any of the other tugs yet? I'm wanting to build the Neptune if I can ever find plans. at 1/96 it would be 16 inches long. which I think would be a cool model. I'm looking foreword
to seeing more on your builds. especially your tugs.

Take care, and Calm Sea's.

Best Regards,
Chris Davis

  

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Michael 400Tue Feb-21-17 08:00 AM
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#9286, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 60
Wed Feb-22-17 03:14 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello Chris,
I bought the book new about 15 years ago, but it seems to be sold out now. I checked it at amazon.com and abebooks.com, they sell used books from different sellers in the US, UK, etc. 15 years ago I bought other used books from abebooks.com, mainly Shipbuilder reprints, and it worked then (I got the books and paid via credit card). A actual search at abebooks.com (author: P. N. Thomas, title: British Steam Tugs) lists 23 used books from sellers worldwide and 6 from sellers in the USA. As explained, I reconstructed my Southampton Titanic steam tugs with plans of other contemporary tugs from this book and photographs of the Titanic tugs. A actual search brought up the following additional bits and pieces: Their first tug tender was the Albert Edward (120 ft., 160 GRT, 100 nhp, twin screws), built 1886. Hercules was built 1890, Vulcan 1893, Ajax 1894. The tug tender Hector (1903-1961) measured 130 ft. (382 GRT, 1400 ihp, twin screws). Neptune was built 1910, had twin screws and 1600 ihp. This link http://www.shipmodel.com/models/hector-full-hull-bld- (with - after bld the link works) shows a model of Hector, please note the twin screws, derrick, portholes and deck benches, as Hector was a tug tender, Neptune is very similar, but with a mahogany bridge, maybe slightly larger than Hector. The funnels were buff in 1912. This link http://www.ebay.com/itm/Model-Boat-Plan-1-48-Scale-Radio-Control-30-Tug-Boat-Joffre-Plan-Article/292016859297 contains three jpg in enlarged version, a plan and description of the steam tug Joffre, which is a good base to reconstruct the larger twin screw Hector or Neptune! As mentioned before, I have a few alterations of these models already on my To Do List, so I will post photographs later this year.
Best regards,
Michael

  

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ShipmodelerWed Feb-22-17 12:25 PM
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#9291, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 61


          

Hello Micheal,

Thank you for the information. I really appreciate it. I'm searching the internet for photos of steam tugs from that era so hopefully I will find some photos.

I was looking at your figures, they are works of art. are those Ho scale figures? I see you modified some with putty to look more like the era clothing. Brilliant job! I'm looking foreword to seeing your finished model.

Take Care, and Calm Sea's,
Chris Davis

  

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Michael 400Thu Mar-02-17 05:09 AM
Member since May 19th 2014
186 posts
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#9314, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 62
Wed Mar-29-17 04:30 AMby Michael 400

          

Hello Chris, hello all,

I have remodeled over 800 figures for my 1/100 models, two packs Preiser 74090, each with 190 unpainted figures in scale 1/100, period 1912 Preiser figures in scale 1/87 (HO), Slater's Plastikard huminatures (3A01) in 3mm scale (1 foot = 3 mm = 1/101,6), Deans marine 1/96 scale naval figs and the figures from the Revell harbour tug boats in 1/108. The 1/96 to 1/108 figures are about 17 to 18 mm height, the 1/87 are about 21 mm height and needed to be remodeled to 18 mm size and proportions. All figures are now from 16 to 17 mm for women and 16 to 18 mm for men, some 19 mm men are a few exceptions.
Enjoy the photographs of the windlass gear and the Olympic/Titanic anchors with persons, from left to right: Preiser 1/87 made much smaller, Slater's Plastikard with added suitcase/coat, Preiser 1/100 with added strawboater hat, 1/87 lady made much smaller, with added strawboater hat, Preiser 1/100 lady with added long dress.
As I have nothing to show than endless detail parts now, there must be a longer break here, with some exceptions from time to time.

Best regards,

Michael

Update, Wednesday, March, 29, answer to the comments (below)

Hello Chris, hello Bill,

thanks for your constant interest in my work since many months/years and your very nice comments (below). In March I had started the Sirocco vents for Titanic 1912 and Olympic 1913. Two weeks of research figuring out each vent of Olympic 1913 and Titanic (mainly TTSM1, Peter Davies-Garners book and plans, this website, Bob Reads research articles, photographs as much as possible) than starting the building of the parts since about three weeks. Before painting them, I will post photographs and answer your posts below, probably in a few weeks.

Best regards,

Michael

Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)
Attachment #3, (jpg file)

  

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ShipmodelerThu Mar-02-17 11:09 AM
Member since Feb 06th 2017
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#9317, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 63


          

Hello Micheal,

Brilliant work as usual. the anchors and their gear look Amazing. and your figures are spot on.
I had just received a copy of the White Star pennant that was flown by the 3 Olympic class liners from the Titanic museum here in the states. I hung it next to my British Union Jack, which both will hang above my models when they are completed. I have been looking over my books on Titanic, and am seriously Thinking of building the Olympic instead of Titanic. she was the only one of the class that not only had a career, but she was credited to sinking two U boats in WW1. The sad thing is, though old reliable had a career, and was the first of the class, and almost identical to her sister Titanic only with minor differences. She seems to have been over looked. both in history, and in modeling. So I think I may look into doing a model of her as she looked on her maiden voyage. Not saying I am not interested in Titanic as I am. But I also think Titanic has been built by so many people that it's time to look at her sister as you have.
Best Regards,
Chris Davis

  

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William W. YoungMon Mar-27-17 09:27 PM
Member since May 31st 2007
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#9415, "RE: Olympic (1913) and other models in Scale 1:100"
In response to Reply # 64


          

Looking forward to a further update of yours.
Bill Young

William W. Young

  

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